Penzance (Treen Farm)

Cornwall

Factfile

Must see attraction:
The clifftop open-air Minack Theatre, where live plays and music are performed between May and September

Average pitch price (per night):
£3, plus £6 per adult at peak season

Caravan Club member:
No

British holidaymakers have flocked to Cornwall for decades, discovering the secrets of the UK’s southernmost county time and time again. It’s the sort of place that inspires repeat visits, especially within the Penzance area of west Cornwall, which sees thousands of tourists arrive every summer.

One of the best places to pitch a caravan is Treen Farm, a relatively small campsite set a couple of hundred yards back from the cliff edge. It provides campers with sinks, showers and even an off-license if required, and makes a good base for holidaymakers who want to explore the area. There are a variety of different places to camp, however, so if a site is better-placed to the points of interest that you want to visit, it may be a better option.

Argyll (Caolasnacon)

Argyll

Factfile

Must see attraction:
Inveray Castle, the location for the 2012 Christmas episode of Downton Abbey

Average pitch price (per night):
£65 per night in July and August, variable prices throughout the year

Caravan Club member:
No

There’s so much to do in the Argyll region of Scotland that the only way to experience it all at an affordable price is to move around in a caravan - this way you get to experience the incredible natural beauty of the countryside at your own pace and ensure that you don’t miss out on anything you want to see. From the Loch Gruinert nature reserve to the imposing Rothesay Castle via some of Argyll’s mouthwatering restaurants serving locally-caught seafood and more varieties of whisky than you could sample in a month, let alone a night, there is no shortage of things to do in Argyll.

The caravan parks in the region each have their own features to contribute towards a memorable holiday. Leachive Caravan Park, for example, is local to a group of beavers that were introduced into the Knapdale Forest ecosystem, while Killegruer Caravan Site is close to golf courses and beaches for its more active guests and Caolasnacon plays host to a family of golden eagles. 

Cumbria (Low Wray)

Cumbria

Factfile

Must see attraction:
Dove Cottage, home of William Wordsworth

Average pitch price (per night):
£15.50 per night in high season

Caravan Club member:
No, but is operated and managed by the National Trust

As the home of the Lake District, you’d expect Cumbria to have some pretty stunning scenery to enjoy on a caravanning holiday, and you wouldn’t be wrong. There are a variety of gorgeous locales to set up camp in throughout the area, each with a range of facilities available in the form of stores, showers and even pubs. The Black Beck Holiday Park, for example, includes a sauna and jacuzzi with a duck feeding pond, Wi-Fi access and various woodland trails to while away the mornings and afternoons in, and Low Wray has a wood-fired pizza oven and children’s adventure playground.

One note of caution to pay attention to, however, is the steepness and narrowness of some of the Lake District’s roads, which may make them unsuitable for certain vehicles towing caravans, despite what the sat-nav might say. With this in mind, you should ensure that you can actually get to the camp you choose - once you’ve found your spot, though, the outstanding natural beauty of the Lake District will ensure a caravanning holiday that you’ll never forget.

Suffolk (The Orchard)

Suffolk

Factfile

Must see attraction:
Sutton Hoo, the famed Anglo-Saxon burial site

Average pitch price (per night):
£18 per night for a standard pitch; offers a Passport scheme which entitles the holder to discounts

Caravan Club member:
No

When you think of camping or caravanning, Suffolk might not be the first area you think of as a potential destination. It doesn’t have the sort of prestige or varied landscape that a Lake District or a Jurassic coast location might have, but it does have consistency when it comes to beautiful countryside, quality pubs and restaurants and a laidback attitude to holiday life. Additionally, wildlife fans will love Trimley Marshes, a wetlands nature reserve designed to protect and preserve various species of rare bird, including redshanks and gadwells.

Campers can really get in touch with nature at the majority of Suffolk’s campsites, enjoying a peaceful, relaxing stay wherever they end up. The Orchard campsite, for example, has its own fishing pond containing carp, bream, roach and tench and a barbecue area for outdoor meals. It’s worth noting that you don’t have to completely unplug from modern life, though – campsites these days tend to offer Wi-Fi and television hook-ups for a daily or hourly fee.

Snowdonia (Gwern Gof Isaf)

Gwynedd

Factfile

Must see attraction:
Llechwedd Slate Caverns

Average pitch price (per night):
£10 per person without hookup, £15 with hookup

Caravan Club member:
No

Given that Snowdonia’s mainly countryside and public transport links aren’t as comprehensive as they are elsewhere in the country, caravanning is an ideal way to see the area, which boasts some of the most dramatic scenery in the UK. It’s the perfect holiday for ramblers and climbers who want to be out all day, but if they want to have the freedom to explore different areas throughout the region then caravans are the perfect way to do so, as long as the roads are accessible.

Facilities at certain campsites may be fairly basic given the relative remoteness of the region – the Gwern Gof Isaf campsite offers showers and toilets and a token-powered hairdryer and that’s about it – but this just makes your stay even more of an adventure. Don’t leave without visiting Zip World, the increasingly popular but relatively benign attraction which boasts the longest zip line in Europe as well as an underground cavern zip line. If you can handle the Snowdonia peaks, a zip line should be a piece of cake!

New Forest (Roundhill)

South West Hampshire

Factfile

Must see attraction:
Shetland ponies!

Average pitch price (per night):
£26 per night in high season

Caravan Club member:
Yes – 15% discount for members

The New Forest is one of the UK’s largest tracts of heathland and forest, designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest and protected from the possibility of deforestation. The most striking sights it has to offer are the groups of wild Shetland ponies that roam the woodland and villages within the forest itself. The area is also home to a wide range of wildlife, including adders, goshawks and red deer – the red squirrel survived here longer than anywhere else in the country before being wiped out by its grey cousins.

With nature reserves, biking and hiking trails, country pubs and even watersports to see, visit and partake in, the New Forest is virtually unparalleled, and taking a caravan means that its size becomes a lot more manageable because you can move about as you please. Some campsites are associated with New Forest Tourism, while some are run independently. The level of facilities tends to differ – Roundhill has electric razor sockets, for instance – but you shouldn’t be paying anything more than about £30 per night for a pitch, making a New Forest caravanning holiday extremely affordable.